Post Reply  Post Thread 
Volcano's
Author Message
Pee Wee Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 483
Joined: Jan 2009
Reputation: 0
Post: #1
Volcano's
News on volcano's
see below
10-03-2009 09:52 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Pee Wee Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 483
Joined: Jan 2009
Reputation: 0
Post: #2
RE: Volcano's
Restless Alaska volcano has yet to erupt

Rachel D'Oro/The Associated Press

İmage
Originally published Sunday, February 1, 2009 at 12:38 p.m.
Updated Monday, February 2, 2009 at 5:25 p.m.

LATEST UPDATE

ABOUT 5:20 p.m. MONDAY: Restlessness at Redoubt Volcano continues. Seismic activity remains elevated and is well above background levels. The volcano has not erupted.A vapor plume is intermittently visible in the AVO web camera. It appears to rise no higher than the volcano\'s summit. A news story this evening incorrectly reported suggested that Anchorage could receive several inches of volcanic ash should the volcano erupt. This should have been reported as several millimeters (or about 1/10 of an inch).AVO continues to monitor potential activity with seismic, satellite and radar data. The Aviation Color Code remains at ORANGE and the Volcano Alert Level remains at WATCH.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Alaska's Mount Redoubt continued to rumble and emit steam Sunday but showed no dramatic burst of energy from the previous day, geologists monitoring the volcano said.

Geologist Tina Neal at the Alaska Volcano Observatory said no flyovers were planned for Sunday unless activity increased significantly. Scientists still believe an eruption is highly likely.

"It could erupt later today or in two weeks - or not at all," Neal said. "It looks like a volcano that wants to erupt and our general impression is that it's more likely to erupt than not. But there's still a possibility that this one could just go back to sleep. There's a lot of uncertainty."

As a precaution, Elmendorf Air Force Base near Anchorage - 100 miles northeast of Redoubt - was moving some of its aircraft to McChord Air Force Base in Washington. Officials said the base was starting with five C-17 cargo planes and could relocate other aircraft if deemed necessary.

"We're just trying to be proactive and protect our assets," said 1st Lt. Erin Slaughter. "Our aircraft support other missions, such as delivering supplies to Iraq and Afghanistan, and this relocation will allow them to still do all those missions even if the volcano does erupt."

Flyovers by geologists Saturday found a quickly growing area of vigorous steaming at the 7,100-foot level on the north side of the mountain. Volcanic gas also was detected.

Scientists noted that a hole in a glacier clinging to the north side of the volcano had doubled in size since Friday, spanning the length of two football fields.

The area is just below a dome that formed the last time Redoubt blew in 1990.

The activity adds to concerns that Redoubt is close to blowing again. An eruption in December 1989 sent an ash cloud 150 miles that flamed out the jet engines of a KLM flight carrying 231 passengers on its way to Anchorage. Pilots were able to restart the engines and land safely.

The observatory last week detected a steep increase in earthquake activity below the volcano, upgrading its alert level to orange, the stage just before full eruption. Vulcanologist Dave Schneider said seismic activity on Friday was the most pronounced, shaking constantly. Since then, activity has been less intense and more intermittent, but still far above normal for Redoubt.

"Volcanoes are kind of like kids. Each has their own personality, their own levels of seismicity," Schneider said. "Redoubt is pretty much above any volcano's seismicity. It's a very restless volcano at present."

The warning that the volcano was likely to blow prompted a rush on dust masks and car air filters in Anchorage as well as closer communities.

Alaska's volcanoes typically start with an explosion that can shoot ash 50,000 feet high and into the jet stream, but there are warning signs because magma causes small earthquakes as it moves.
10-03-2009 09:55 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Pee Wee Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 483
Joined: Jan 2009
Reputation: 0
Post: #3
Semeru Volcano, Indonesia
Volcano News - John Seach
Volcano Early Warning Program

Reports by John Seach

Friday 6th March 2009
Semeru Volcano, Indonesia
Increased activity has been reported at Semeru volcano in Indonesia. Between 6th February and 4th March 2009 there were 873 explosion earthquakes registered, with an average of 34 events per day. On 5th March there was one period of tremor recorded. On 6th March one episode of tremor was recorded accompanied by booming sounds which were heard at Semeru observatory. On 6th March at 10:28 hr a booming noise was heard while the summit was covered in cloud. Semeru is at level 2 alert (Waspada) out of a maximum of 4. Explosions occur at an interval of 20-30 minutes, with ash emissions 100-400 m above Jonggring Seloko crater. So far the current eruptions have not been accompanied by pyroclastic flows, but this remains a danger. Areas which may be affected by pyroclastic flows include inhabited areas of Rowo Baung, Supit, Pronojiwo, Urip, and Umbulandi Urang Supit. Rowo Baung and Supit are the nearest villages to the eruptive centre, 9 km from the peak of Gunung Semeru. There is a potential threat to sand mining activities at Supit and Rowo Baung. Recommendations from the Indonesian Centre of Volcanology and Geology are that people avoid the area 4 km SE of the active crater due to the threat of pyroclastic flows. People are advised not to climb to the summit peak (Mahameru). Residents should prepare for possible ashfall. Aircraft should beware of explosion hazards, and ash emissions.
More on Semeru Volcano...
Volcanoes of Semeru...
10-03-2009 10:03 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Pee Wee Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 483
Joined: Jan 2009
Reputation: 0
Post: #4
ECUADOR - Guagua Pichincha volcano
10-03-2009 10:08 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Pee Wee Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 483
Joined: Jan 2009
Reputation: 0
Post: #5
Caught On Tape: Volcano Erupts In Japan
Caught On Tape: Volcano Erupts In Japan
Posted by: Chelsi Zash Created: 3/10/2009 12 17 PM Updated: 3/10/2009 12445 PM



Sakura Island, Japan -- The Sakurajima volcano, near the city of Kagoshima in southern Japan, erupted in the early hours of Tuesday morning, spewing out lava and a thick plume of black smoke into the air.

A fixed camera set up by the Japanese Transport Ministry captured the action as the Showa crater erupted around 05:30 local time (16:30 ET).

Reports from Japan claimed debris from the eruption landed as far as two kilometres (1.3 miles) away.

An eruption had been expected since a series of smaller explosions began over the weekend.

Since reawakening in 1955 the volcano has been one of Japan's most active, recording thousands of minor explosions a year.

There were no immediate reports of any damage caused by Tuesday's eruption.
CBS

10-03-2009 10:20 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Pee Wee Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 483
Joined: Jan 2009
Reputation: 0
Post: #6
Alaska's Redoubt volcano erupts four times: ashfall advisory for Susitna Valley
İmage
Alaska's Redoubt volcano erupts four times: ashfall advisory for Susitna Valley

Mark Thiessen/The Associated Press

Originally published Sunday, March 22, 2009 at 11:54 p.m.
Updated Monday, March 23, 2009 at 6:41 a.m.

This Feb. 2, 2009 photo provided by the Alaska Volcano Observatory show Redoubt Volcano from Kasilof, Alaska.

The Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska - Alaska's Mount Redoubt volcano erupted four times overnight, sending an ash plume more than 9 miles into the air in the volcano's first emission in nearly 20 years.

Residents in the state's largest city was spared from falling ash, though fine gray dust was falling Monday morning on small communities north of Anchorage.

Ash from Alaska's volcanos is like a rock fragment with jagged edges and has been used as an industrial abrasive. It can injure skin, eyes and breathing passages. The young, the elderly and people with respiratory problems are especially susceptible to ash-related health problems.

The ash can also causes problems in planes.

Alaska Airlines on Monday canceled 19 flights in and out of the Anchorage international airport because of the ash.

Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage told only essential personnel to report to work. The Air Force says 60 planes, including fighter jets, cargo aircraft and a 747 commercial plane, were being sheltered.

The first eruption, in a sparsely populated area across Cook Inlet from the Kenai Peninsula, occurred at 10:38 p.m. Sunday and the fourth happened at 1:39 a.m. Monday, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

The wind patterns were taking the ash cloud away from Anchorage, toward Willow and Talkneetna, near Mount McKinley, North America's largest mountain in Denali National Park.

Dave Stricklan, a hydrometeorogical technician with the National Weather Service, expected very fine ash.

"Just kind of a light dusting," he said. He said the significant amount of ash probably dropped immediately, right down the side of the volcano.

"The heavier stuff drops out very quickly, and then the other stuff filters out. There's going to be a very fine amount of it that's going to be suspended in the atmosphere for quite some time," he said. "The finer ash is going to travel farther, and any ash can affect aviation safety."

The 10,200-foot Redoubt Volcano, roughly 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, last erupted during a four-month period from 1989-90.

In its last eruption, Redoubt sent ash 150 miles away into the path of a KLM jet and its four engines flamed out. The jet dropped more than 2 miles before the crew was able to restart all engines and land safely. The plane required $80 million in repairs.

Meanwhile, the volcano became restless earlier this year. The observatory had warned in late January that an eruption could occur at any time.

Increased earthquake activity over the past 48 hours prompted scientists to raise the alert level for Mount Redoubt on Sunday.

On Sunday morning, 40 to 50 earthquakes were being recorded every hour.

A steam plume rising about 1,000 feet above the mountain peak was observed Saturday.
23-03-2009 08:45 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
admiral1
Unregistered

 
Post: #7
Smaller eruptions at Alaska's Redoubt volcano; oil storage facility monitored
İmage
Smaller eruptions at Alaska's Redoubt volcano; oil storage facility monitored

Mary Pemberton/The Associated Press

Originally published Wednesday, March 25, 2009 at 6:42 a.m.
Updated Wednesday, March 25, 2009 at 3:34 p.m.
İmage
Flood water and debris from the Drift River surround an aircraft hangar and nearby buildings at the Drift River Terminal Facility on the west side of Cook Inlet, 22 miles from the summit of Alaska's Mount Redoubt volcano, on Tuesday, March 24, 2009. The facility collects oil from offshore platforms. Now, with Redoubt melting ice and snow on its flanks, the river is a mile-wide zone of broken trees, ice, mud, ash and water. Oil remains in two of the facility's seven tanks.

Peninsula Clarion

ANCHORAGE, Alaska - Alaska's Mount Redoubt continued to erupt Wednesday with at least two small explosions, while a Chevron-operated pipeline company assessed the condition of an oil storage facility near the volcano.

The eruptions were picked up by seismic monitors. They showed an explosion occurring shortly after 5 a.m. that lasted about 10 minutes at the volcano about 100 miles southwest of Anchorage. That eruption sent an ash plume about 15,000 feet into the sky.

The cloud drifted to sparsely populated areas to the north and northwest, in the same direction as ash from much larger explosions that occurred since Mount Redoubt began erupting Sunday night.

The volcano, which lies on the other side of Cook Inlet from Anchorage, erupted again at 10:17 a.m. in what the Alaska Volcano Observatory described as a "small explosive event." This time an ash cloud was not detected by radar.

Seismic activity suggests that the volcano is producing lava from its summit. However, poor weather has prevented confirmation of that finding.

By early Wednesday afternoon, the volcano had been relatively quite for 36 hours, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory in Anchorage.

While the volcano has quieted, geologists said volcano-caused mudflows and flooding will remain a hazard in the Drift River valley.

The Cook Inlet Pipeline Co. continued Wednesday to assess the condition of the Drift River Terminal, a Chevron-operated facility where 6.2 million gallons of crude are stored in two tanks. A helicopter landed at the oil storage terminal on Tuesday, said Cook Inlet Pipeline Co. contractor Lana Johnson.

Tuesday's assessment indicated no damage to the tanks or to earthen berms around each tank, which are designed to hold all the oil in a tank if it fails, Johnson said.

A cement-enhanced dike put in around the tank farm after Redoubt last exploded in 1989 also showed no damage. There was, however, one area where muddy water had lapped over the edge, Johnson said.

She said an airplane runway is covered with debris and is unusable until cleared. There also was some flooding in the terminal building next to the runway.

A crew on Tuesday turned power back on to the facility, but there's no staff on site after 11 people were evacuated Monday.

A second trip to the terminal was planned for Wednesday to look at whether the pumping system could be used to offload 6.2 million gallons of oil stored in two tanks, if Chevron decided it was necessary to remove the product.

The pumping system must be operational to remove the oil, Johnson said.

Chevron, which owns half of the pipeline company, is continuing to assess the situation. Johnson said the company has made no decision to remove the oil.

"Right now nothing can happen because you can't bring any equipment in because the runway is closed," Johnson said.

The terminal, which was built in the 1960s by Unocal, is used to store oil produced from Chevron-owned oil platforms in Cook Inlet. Chevron, which owns 10 platforms in Cook Inlet, is redirecting oil that would have been bound for Drift River to two other facilities.

The company is working on a contingency plan for when those storage facilities reach capacity, said Chevron spokeswoman Roxanne Sinz, adding that she could not talk in detail about the plan.

"We have capability of approximately 10 more days of being able to take on storage," she said. "Hopefully, Drift River will be able to come back up."
26-03-2009 10:24 AM
Quote this message in a reply
admiral1
Unregistered

 
Post: #8
Can Another Great Volcanic Eruption Happen in Alaska?
İmage

Volcano Hazards Program
U.S. Geological Survey
Fact Sheet 075-98
Version 1.0
1998

Can Another Great Volcanic Eruption Happen in Alaska? (title)
Full-text PDF PDF
The largest eruption on Earth this century occurred at Novarupta Volcano, Alaska, in June 1912, creating Katmai Caldera and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes. Volcanic ash (more than from all other historical eruptions in Alaska combined) devastated areas hundreds of miles away. Such massive eruptions will occur again in southern Alaska, threatening its rapidly growing population. To protect the public, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other scientists with the Alaska Volcano Observatory closely monitor the State's many active volcanoes.

On the afternoon of June 6, 1912, an ominous cloud rose into the sky above Mount Katmai on the Alaska Peninsula. The cloud quickly reached an altitude of 20 miles, and within 4 hours, ash from a huge volcanic eruption began to fall on the village of Kodiak, 100 miles to the southeast. By the end of the eruption on June 9th, the ash cloud, now thousands of miles across, shrouded southern Alaska and western Canada, and sulfurous ash was falling on Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington. The next day the cloud passed over Virginia, and by June 17th it reached Algeria in Africa.

During the 3 days of the eruption, darkness and suffocating conditions caused by falling ash and sulfur dioxide gas immobilized the population of Kodiak. Sore eyes and respiratory distress were rampant, and water became undrinkable. Radio communications were totally disrupted, and with visibility near zero, ships couldn't dock. Roofs in Kodiak collapsed under the weight of more than a foot of ash, buildings were wrecked by ash avalanches that rushed down from nearby hillslopes, and other structures burned after being struck by lightning from the ash cloud.
İmage
lava dome of Novarupta volcano, Alaska

İmage
Resident in devastated village of Kodiak, June 1912

Today, the blocky lava dome of Novarupta sits in the ash-and-debris-filled volcanic crater, more than a mile wide, created by a cataclysmic 1912 volcanic eruption that rained ash over southern Alaska, western Canada, and the Pacific Northwest. Snow-capped Mount Mageik, another potentially explosive volcano in Katmai National Park, can be seen in the background. Photo on right shows a resident of the devastated village of Kodiak, 100 miles southeast of Novarupta, standing in deep drifts of ash shortly after the June 1912 eruption (courtesy National Geographic Society)

Similar conditions prevailed elsewhere in southern Alaska, and several villages were abandoned forever. Animal and plant life was decimated by ash and acid rain from the eruption. Bears and other large animals were blinded by ash and starved when large numbers of the plants and small animals they lived on were wiped out. Millions of dead birds that had been blinded and coated by volcanic ash littered the ground. Aquatic organisms, such as mussels, insect larvae, and kelp, as well as the fish that fed upon them, perished in ash-choked shallow water. Alaska's salmon-fishing industry was devastated, especially from 1915 to 1919, because of the starvation and failure of many adult fish to spawn in ash-choked streams.

In 1916, a National Geographic Society expedition led by Robert Griggs visited Mount Katmai and found a 2-mile-wide crater where its summit had been before 1912. Nearby, the expedition discovered a newly formed lava dome they called "Novarupta" and huge flows of volcanic ash filling what they named the "Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes" for the numerous plumes of steam rising from the still-hot ground. Griggs' descriptions of these spectacular features helped persuade President Woodrow Wilson to create Katmai National Monument (now National Park) in 1918.


İmage
Ash fall from Novarupta compared to that from other recent eruptions in Alaska
The ash fall from the cataclysmic 1912 eruption of Novarupta (large gray shaded area) dwarfs that produced by recent eruptions of Augustine (blue area), Redoubt (orange area), and Spurr (yellow area) Volcanoes. Old-timers in Alaska can recall dozens of eruptions from these and other Alaskan volcanoes. Within 500 miles of Anchorage, several volcanoes (brown triangles) have exploded in Novarupta-scale eruptions in the past 4,000 years. Beyond the areas shown here, ash fall from these recent eruptions of Augustine, Redoubt, and Spurr Volcanoes was negligible, but ultrafine dust and sulfurous aerosols were held aloft and transported farther by high-altitude winds. Even though relatively small, the volcanic ash clouds from these eruptions still resulted in airport closures and damage to many jet aircraft. Because of the size and frequency of eruptions and prevailing winds, Alaskan volcanoes present a greater threat to aviation on the west coast of the United States than do the volcanoes of the Cascade Range in the Pacific Northwest.






In the 1950's, volcanologists discovered that the 1912 eruption was actually from Novarupta, not Mount Katmai. Novarupta's eruption had removed so much molten rock (magma) from beneath Mount Katmai that it caused a cubic mile of Katmai's summit to collapse.

The chance of another Novarupta-scale eruption occurring in any given year is small, but such cataclysmic volcanic events are certain to happen again in Alaska. Within 500 miles of Anchorage, volcanologists have identified at least seven deposits of volcanic ash younger than 4,000 years that approach or exceed the volume of ash ejected by Novarupta in 1912, including a thick layer of ash erupted from Hayes Volcano, only 90 miles northwest of Anchorage. Of the numerous volcanoes scattered across southern Alaska, at least 10 are capable of exploding in a 1912-scale eruption.

İmage
In the 1950's, volcanologists discovered that the great Alaskan eruption of 1912 was not from Mount Katmai, as previously thought, but from a new vent at Novarupta. The eruption removed so much molten rock (magma) from beneath Mount Katmai, however, that a cubic mile of Katmai's summit collapsed to form a 2-mile-wide volcanic depression, called a caldera, which now holds a lake 800 feet deep. Nearby Trident Volcano issued several lava flows (red) and small ash clouds during the decade beginning in 1953. There is no historical record of eruptions at Mageik, Martin, and Griggs Volcanoes, but their vigorous sulfur-rich fumaroles (volcanic gas vents) suggest that they might erupt in the near future.


When volcanoes erupt explosively, high-speed flows of hot ash (pyroclastic flows) and landslides can devastate areas 10 or more miles away, and huge mudflows of volcanic ash and debris (lahars) can inundate valleys more than 50 miles downstream. Around island volcanoes, like Augustine in Cook Inlet, pyroclastic flows and landslides can generate giant ocean waves (tsunamis) that threaten nearby coastal communities. Explosive eruptions can also produce large earthquakes. In 1912, when Novarupta exploded and Mount Katmai collapsed, 14 quakes of magnitude 6 to 7 rocked the region, and countless smaller shocks occurred. As with Novarupta, however, the greatest hazard posed by eruptions of most Alaskan volcanoes is airborne ash&emdash;even minor amounts of ash can cause the engines of jet aircraft to suddenly fail in flight, create health problems, close roads and airports, disrupt utilities, and contaminate water supplies for hundreds of miles downwind.

In 1912, Alaska was very sparsely populated, and there were few airplanes. Now, nearly three-quarters of a million people live in the State, and aircraft carrying more than 15,000 passengers and millions of dollars in cargo pass near Alaska's more than 40 historically active volcanoes each day.

The heavy ash fall produced by a Novarupta-scale eruption occurring today in southern Alaska would bring the State's economy to a standstill and kill or injure hundreds. Clinics would be overwhelmed by people with eye, throat, and lung damage. Building ventilation systems would have to be closed to outside air. Ash entering computers, bankcard machines, and other electronic equipment would cause them to break down. Automobile, snowmobile, and boat engines would also be damaged. Airports, including Anchorage, which handles the largest amount of air cargo of any airport in the United States and is a refueling stop for many trans-Pacific flights, would be closed until runways could be cleared of ash. To avoid the ash cloud, aircraft would have to be diverted around most of Alaska, Canada, and the Northern United States, seriously disrupting national and international commerce.

İmage
Size of notable volcanic eruptions
The 1912 eruption of Novarupta was the largest on Earth this century. Explosive eruptions are best compared by recalculating the amount of erupted volcanic materials, such as ash and pumice, in terms of the original volume of molten rock (magma) released (shown diagramatically by orange spheres). On this basis, the 3 cubic miles of magma erupted from Novarupta in 1912 was 600 times greater than the total erupted by Redoubt Volcano in 1989&endash;90 and 30 times greater than the volume of magma released in the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, which killed 57 people and caused damage exceeding 1 billion dollars. Even the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo, the second largest in the world this century, was less than half the size of Novarupta's eruption.


Even years later, volcanic ash deposited within 200 miles of the site of the eruption would be remobilized by windstorms and blown high into the atmosphere, renewing the hazards for people and machinery. Fish and wildlife would be devastated as they were after the 1912 eruption, wreaking prolonged havoc on Alaska's now large and economically important fishing and tourism industries.

Promptly restoring normal life would depend heavily on community spirit, civic organization, and pre-eruption planning. By working closely with local authorities, air carriers, and the public, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, is helping to minimize the effects of volcanic eruptions on Alaskan communities. AVO provides volcano hazards assessments and closely monitors the State's volcanoes for any signs of unrest, so that it can issue timely warnings of impending eruptions.

In addition to active participation in AVO, the ongoing work of the USGS Volcano Hazards Program in other volcanically active regions of the United States, including Hawaii, California, Arizona, Wyoming, and the Pacific Northwest, is helping to better protect people's lives and property from volcano hazards.

By

Judy Fierstein, Wes Hildreth, James W. Hendley II, and Peter H. Stauffer

COOPERATING ORGANIZATIONS
Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys
Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Federal Aviation Administration
National Geographic Society
National Park Service
National Weather Service

For more information contact:
Alaska Volcano Observatory (907) 786-7497
4200 University Drive
Anchorage, AK 99508

01-04-2009 01:40 PM
Quote this message in a reply
« Next Oldest | Next Newest »
Post Reply  Post Thread 

Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
updated_anim.gif Peru's Ubinas Volcano Erupts April 17, 2014 shirley 0 1,679 18-04-2014 05:00 PM
Last Post: shirley
  Mt Etna Volcano, Italy - John Seach , Friday, January 14, 2011 larry T 0 3,253 14-01-2011 12:32 PM
Last Post: larry T
  Tonga Volcano admiral1 0 2,474 20-03-2009 12:23 PM
Last Post: admiral1
  Scientists lower alert level for Alaska volcano admiral1 0 1,998 11-03-2009 12:05 PM
Last Post: admiral1

View a Printable Version
Send this Thread to a Friend
Subscribe to this thread |